Holiday Madness: Creating Appealing Offers in Your Fitness Studios

Happy Holidays! It seems like Halloween is the “gateway” to all-things holiday madness, as we now find ourselves readying to close out another year. As fitness studio owners this is a great time to celebrate with your patrons, and to capitalize on the many opportunities to help members manage common stressors while creating community! Additionally, designing exceptionally appealing sales offers is a great way to power through Q4 and finish the year strong! 

 

The key to creating exceptional offers is to review what has worked well in the first three quarters, and to build off those successes whenever possible. And as always, there is no better way to please members than to simply ask and listen to what they truly want! Here are some suggestions to create offers that appeal.

 

Offers that resonate:

1.   Finish Strong: Most folks wait until January 1 to set and start resolutions. Why not capture these good intentions before the year closes out? Depending on your program offerings, create incentives through attractive pricing that encourages patrons to lock in with you before the new year’s madness is upon them. Additionally, consider ways to create unique “specialness” as a reward for locking in now - such as the ability to register early for popular classes, or to book into your popular personal training time slots when the new year craziness arrives. Consider finishing out the year with a challenge that draws in and engages folks into programming even when the holiday weeks get busy. As a fitness studio owner, don’t stop now! Look for simple ways to maximize participation and enhance retention during this busy season.

2.   Retail Matters: Beef up retail selections as an auxiliary revenue stream. This is the perfect time of year to consider spending a little extra cash on increasing quality inventory items to sell that compliment your core program offerings. Want to make the sale even sweeter? Customize and assemble grab-and-go gift assortments for those last-minute gifts that folks always need to pick-up; provide your patrons the gift fully ready to hand-off with business-colored tissue paper and a logo-ed gift bag! Market your retail items and set retail sales goalsduring this time period. Commit to surpassing these goals by selling lifestyle, brand, or unique retail items that will be popular in your studio! 

3.   Gift Cards: Gift certificates are a must, so eliminate any barriers to buying them. Create professional, aesthetically appealing gift certificates with envelopes to keep right at the register for the many GC requests at the holidays. Have a clear and manageable tracking system for your front desk employees at POS. Market this gift option feverishly. Plan ahead, and offer attractive sales on key seasonal retail days (Black Friday, Small Business Saturday, Cyber Monday, etc.) such as “20% off! Get a GC valued at $100 for $80 for shopping with us on Small Business Saturday”). A non-negotiable? Be certain patrons can purchase gift certificates onlinevia your website or online storefront. Make the transactions easy, and watch your sales soar! 

Boost up the end of the year in your business by creating appealing offers for your unique client base. Think creatively and plan ahead with item selection, buying, merchandising, and marketing efforts to maximize the opportunities during this “Most Wonderful Time of the Year!”

Post was originally published by the Association of Fitness Studios, where Bahneman serves on theIndustry Advisory Panel.

The True Value of Sweat Equity

Small business owners are accustomed to putting in a little old-fashioned elbow grease in to get their business off the ground. Our trusted Merriam-Webster defines sweat equity as 
“equity in a property resulting from labor invested in improvements that increase its value; also the labor so invested.” 

 

As fitness studio owners, we put in (and clean up!) a LOT of sweat! Applying this concept is much more than at first meets the eye. From business concept into reality, in daily operations that include everything from cleaning the bathrooms to tackling a myriad of issues in human resources, small business owners are rarely exempt from getting their hands dirty in every aspect of business upkeep. Most business owners have worked for companies large and small prior to taking the leap into ownership, so we might recall the days of having various departments or support staff to handle the tasks that now fall 100% under our guise. That ends up being a lot of sweat, both in the literal and figurative sense.

 

The aim of this article is to shed light on the concept of sweat equity to allow would-be and newer fitness studio owners behind the curtain. These might even be great reminders for established studio owners as they self-check their current state of being. My hope is that you feel less isolated if you are running a business and finding yourself slightly overwhelmed, sweating more than you might like to right now! Within each bullet point are actionable items as tips to help as you manage the sweatier times! 

 

Sweating throughs and must-dos:

1.   There will be the occasional sleepless night when you either (1) work on the items that did not get done during the day or (2) worry. Challenging times, whether due to newly opening, staffing issues, a tough economy, expansion, or a corporate competitor setting up shop in your neighborhood sometimes means longer days or even sleepless nights. No one except an owner really understands the gravity of the responsibilities – financially and emotionally, to your community, to your staff, and to your own family. Even when business is good, there will be times you metaphorically sweat, because you care, because “it” must get done, and because you want to flourish! Try not to allow these moments to break you. Rather, use them as the defining moments that strengthen your abilities to handle the realities of business ownership. Tip: Perhaps befriend other local studio owners; nothing soothes the soul like a short coffee date with someone who is also in the trenches and who empathizes with your position.

 

2.  Mindful use of every hour of every day of a small business owner’s habits matter, particularly in the earliest days of the business, matters. Sit down at the end of every day, and plan out the next. Chart workflow at week’s end, and decide where you can improve. Work-life balance is perhaps laughable during business start-up or during periods of great change, but there must be an end in sight to make owning and operating your studio sustainable. It is like designing a fitness program versus just working your clients out – one gets results on purpose, the other (maybe) by accident. Tip: Consciously decide where you want and need to put your sweat in each and every day! Take ten minutes before you close out each day to map tomorrow’s plan. Take an half hour on Sunday night to plan the week ahead. Be realistic; allow more time (15-30 minutes minimum) for each task than you think you actually need.

 

3.  Avoid the pitfall of leaving a decent career working for another company, only to buy yourself a job with much more massive responsibility! We hear it all the time – make time to work ON your business, not just IN your business. And truer words have never been spoken. The time you put in now strategically planning for growth are the moments that will allow the business to evolve as time passes. It may feel impossible some days, as business owners may always sweat to some degree. It is the very nature of the role! The seeds you plant each day will bear fruit; be certain of what you are planting so that what you are watering with your sweat ultimately bears what you intend. You cannot plant an apple tree and hope to harvest grapes. All the work you put into growing the apple tree will only serve to frustrate you in the end. Tip: Be strategic about how you apply your very precious sweat each day, each week, each month, each year. Even when time seemingly doesn’t allow for it, make the time to work on your business even if it is only for a short time each day or week. It is a cumulative effect: the more time you spend working on your business, the more time you will soon have to work on your business!

In summary, putting in sweat equity or “the labor so invested” is a part of the fun of building a fitness studio! Even if we could pay someone to do all the tasks we maybe don’t want to, it somehow takes away from the experience of birthing and raising the baby! We don’t always want to be changing diapers, but boy, it sure makes us appreciate the potty-training successes! Find the beauty in even the most menial of daily tasks, and drop deeply into the excitement of planning for your business’ future. Your team will be inspired as you walk-the-walk alongside them; your community will feel connected to your business as they witness the commitment!  Success is not guaranteed and is rarely automatic, so embrace the journey and enjoy the wild ride. 

Post was originally published by the Association of Fitness Studios, where Bahneman serves on the Industry Advisory Panel.

What to Think About When Considering a Business Partnership: Part 2

Last month, I tackled the topic of important items to think about before jumping into business partnership. This month, I will offer thoughts to consider if you have now agreed to setting up the terms of a successful partnership. And while this list could be as long as a book, I have narrowed it down to 5 simple tips to stimulate good conversation between you and your partner!

 

There is a lot to consider when taking the leap into small business ownership. The ante is upped substantially when any entrepreneur decides to open a brick-and-mortar fitness studio. The everyday stresses of typical business ownership become magnified as rent payments, utility bills, and payroll become a monthly reality. It seems logical that having a partner to share the experience – and workload – would be a win-win. No one person can truly be the jack-of-all trades and excel at all aspects of business ownership. And having another motivated professional to bounce ideas off of, to ground you, and celebrate successes can be a nice set-up! 

 

If you feel confident and ready to enter into legal business partnership, it is imperative to consider as many angles as possible going into it as you join forces.

 

I have generated a list of suggested conversations and actionable items to address with your business partner. This is by no means an exhaustive list – allow it to guide the process as you birth the business plans and the relationship expectations.

 

1.    Write the official business and marketing plan together, to include drafting the financial pro forma.A business plan is very important for many reasons. It will be a non-negotiable if you seek any sort of financing. But even more importantly, putting fingers to keyboard and writing a business and marketing plan with your new partner opens up conversations and raises questions that you might not otherwise think to address with each other. It is a great way to observe work-styles, to discuss each other’s strengths and weaknesses, and to create a clear plan, in writing, that each of you has a voice in. Developing financial projections together will give each partner a realistic expectation for the potential demands of a developing business. Finalize the plan, use it as a working document, and keep it accessible in your studio files. If you do run into challenges down the road, you can fall back on these documents that you, jointly, created. 

2.    What does“partnership”mean legally, and in reality. As part of your business plan, you will need to identify the type of partnership you are in. An accountant and attorney can look at many factors and guide you best for tax and legal purposes – but what about the boots on the ground-day-to-day real life experience of partnership? If you decide on a 50/50 partnership, who IS the chief when differing opinions must lead to a solid final decision? Where does the rubber truly meet the road? Difficult decisions on financials, personnel, growth, expansion – even paint colors – will arise! While it is nice to think that partners will be able to work peacefully together on all solutions, the truth is that is often not the case. Have these conversations early, and get crystal clear. These legal agreements should be filed in your Operating Agreement.

 

3.     Write job descriptions for each owner, to include salary or draw. There will be a lot to be done and not a lot of folks or resources to do it. It is the nature of small business start-ups. It won’t always be that way, hopefully, but plan it to be so for the foreseeable future. You may envision a partnership where together you tackle all projects cohesively! While that can happen, it may also not be efficient. Consider each partner’s strengths and work to them; consider the tasks no one wants to do and allocate them up-front and fairly; decide where you can hire out; consider which aspects you MUST work on collaboratively to grow the business and stick to it. Set clear expectations of each other going in. Be flexible in the plan, but have a plan. Include the agreed salary plan or draw for each partner – and what happens if business finances get tight one month? What does it look like when one partner wants time-off or a vacation? What if both partners want to be away at the same time?! These are tough but real and necessary conversations that will benefit both in the long run. Officially file all of these documents alongside your Operating Agreement. 

 

4.     Discuss the exit strategy. Life changes, and it throws curve balls. It is imperative to plan for worst case scenarios. What if one partner wants to exit the business? No matter what the reason, it is rarely a simple process. Discuss the potential of this happening, in depth, with your partner. Make the Exit Strategy a part of your official Operating Agreement. It could save relationships, friendships, and financial strife down the road.

5.     Take your time. This one is worth repeating from Part 1 of this blog. Entrepreneurs are, by nature, motivated, driven, passionate people. Allow yourself time to take the “cosmic deep breath”. Explore the ins and outs deeply as you create the details of your business partnership. If you need more time, discussion, or evaluation, take it now. Ask many difficult questions: Can you truly survive the challenges of this partnership if it is a friend or family member? What are your strengths and weaknesses as a professional, and how will you complement each other? The list of questions goes on. Brainstorm and create a final Q and A – then go over it a few times with your partner to develop a real comfort level around expectations and plans.

 These five tips will allow you to take a deep dive with your business partner so you can make it work together for the long-run. Statistically, small businesses close every day, which taxes people personally, financially, and emotionally. Small businesses in partnership can prove even more challenging as folks constantly work to align and flow amidst the normal stresses of business ops. Considering the steps above might allow you to move forward with your partner with greater confidence, and ease. The seriousness of a legal business partnership should never be underestimated – and due diligence on the front end will save time, money, relationships, and even the business in the long-run.

Post was originally published by the Association of Fitness Studios, where Bahneman serves on the Industry Advisory Panel. 

What to Think About When Considering a Business Partnership: Part 1

There is a lot to consider when taking the leap into small business ownership. The ante is upped substantially when any entrepreneur decides to open a brick-and-mortar fitness studio. The everyday stresses of typical business ownership become magnified as rent payments, utility bills, and payroll become a monthly reality. It seems logical that having a partner to share the experience – and workload – would be a win-win. No one person can truly be the jack-of-all trades and excel at all aspects of business ownership. And having another motivated professional to bounce ideas off of, to ground you, and celebrate successes can be a nice set-up! But before entering into legal business partnership, it is imperative to keep an open mind and consider what the partnership will actually be like on both a micro and a macro level. 

 

I have drafted a two-part blog article, because this is an important topic to tackle! Part 1 addresses points to consider BEFORE you sign on any dotted line and create a partnership. Part 2 offers insight into the necessary details to consider once you decide you will for-sure move forward and join forces.

 

I have generated a list of conversation starters and actionable items here that really pack a punch with your would-be business partner. An up-front assessment of where you both are, related expectations, and where you think you might go can save a lot of hassle in the future!

 

1.    Identify if your vision for the business actually aligns.This includes not only taking a big picture look (ie We will stick with running one studio or grow to ten?) to having conversations on the reality of daily roles (ie What will both our roles look like as we work ON the business and IN the business, separately and together, and is this acceptable for each party?). This can simply be a few discussions over coffee as you learn how to (and if you can) effectively communicate and align ideas and goals with your would-be partner. 

2.    Strongly consider writing the business plan, together.A tangible business plan is very important for many reasons. It will be a non-negotiable if you seek any sort of financing. But even more importantly, putting fingers to keyboard and writing a business and marketing plan with your would-be partner opens up conversations and raises questions that you might not otherwise think to address with each other. Consider this the first step as you prepare to enter into this very serious “marriage”. It is a great way to observe work-styles, to determine how effectively you might collaborate, and create a clear plan in writing that each of you has an viable voice in. It is great to have this plan created so when you do run into challenges in processes later, you can fall back-on these plans that you, jointly, created. 

3.    Open up your financials and be prepared to get very real.A business partnership, plain and simple, means a co-mingling of finances. Each person will bring their current reality to the table, and it is imperative to talk this out. Financing a start-up, surviving the often-stressful early days, creating stability, growing the business and beyond will always include financial discussions. Learning how to navigate these discussions honestly early-on will be a good indicator if you will be able to do this successfully as true legal business partners in the throes of operations.

4.    Discuss what a “break-up” could look like.

Take the time to really analyze the details of your potential legal partnership. Individual lives, circumstances, and goals change – that is simple truth of a life in motion. Can you go separately peacefully, if it comes to that? Before even considering putting this partnership into writing (which you will, as you move to Part 2 of this blog article), consider having this candid chat with your potential partner. Toss out all kinds of scenarios and see how it lands and how the options feel as you explore them together, should a separation become part of your business reality.

5.     Take your time. Entrepreneurs are, by nature, motivated, driven, passionate people. Allow yourself time to take the “cosmic deep breath”. Explore the ins and outs deeply BEFORE signing-up for a business partnership. If you need more time, discussion, or evaluation, take it now. Ask many questions: Can you truly survive the challenges of a partnership with a friend or family member, if that is the case? What are your strengths and weaknesses as a professional, and does your would-be partner compliment you? Why are you really choosing partnership over solopreneurship? The list of questions goes on. Brainstorm and create a Q and A – then go over it with your potential partner to further evaluate if you are really a good “match”!

These five tips will allow you to better determine if you and your potential partner have what it takes to make it for the long-run. Statistically, small businesses close every day, which taxes people personally, financially, and emotionally. Small businesses in partnership can prove even more challenging as folks constantly work to align and flow amidst the normal stresses of business ops. Perhaps the steps above will be the conversation starters that allow you to move forward with your would-be partner or to pause and re-assess. The seriousness of a legal business partnership should never be underestimated – and due diligence on the front end will save time, money, relationships, and even the business in the long-run.

Post was originally published by the Association of Fitness Studios, where Bahneman serves on the Industry Advisory Panel.

First Impressions Matter Most

Consumers make a lot of snap judgments your business before they even know it. These subconscious decisions are creatively explained in research and books such as Blinkby Malcolm Gladwell. Like it or not, you will be judged. While that might sit funny in your gut, it is the truth. With client retention being one of the most challenging aspects in the fitness industry, as small business owners we really have to do a bang up job when it comes to making favorable first impressions. 

 

I have generated a list of three simple tips that really pack a punch. Assess where you currently are, create a plan, and follow-through with consistency and watch what unfolds!

 

1.    Identify how you want to make people feel the moment they walk through your door.Create the experience in a detailed fashion in your mind and then on paper. Consider ambience, lighting, sounds, smells, tidiness and cleanliness (these are not the same things!), staff appearances, greetings, and more. Appeal to as many senses as possible, as memory is stored and housed all throughout the brain and physical body. After developing a clear vision, take the necessary steps to actually make this happen. Be sure and outline these musts in your studio operations manual; be certain your manager knows the non-negotiables, and ensure that staff trainings are consistent. Lastly, use secret shoppers from time to time to let you know how the studio is performing in this realm. Remind yourself: people will rarely remember what you say but they will always remember how you make them feel.

2.    Create a consistent experience in client sessions and classes.This does not mean that your staff are trained robots or exact replicas of you. Rather, know your avatar and teach your team to speak to that client. After all, the charm of small business is often the personalities and unique skill sets of the team members. Determine a way to maintain this highly valued quality while setting the tone with some consistent patterns or behaviors. Be sure to outline it, in detail, in your operations manual. Then train new hires consistently and evaluate the veterans with some regularity. For example, all our yoga classes begin and end the same way and have a common thread or feel throughout. So long as our teachers are working within our prescribed framework, the sky then becomes the limit with their creative processes. While our clientele like cannot identify exactly what “it” is, they know they feel at home and they know what to expect. Like it or not, we are all creatures of habit and we find comfort in some semblance of routine. When your clientele feels comfortable, cared for, and at home, they will come back.

3.    Clients will also remember the last experience they have when walking out the door and it will impact their desire to return.Do you and your staff ask them how class or their session went? Ask them if there was any way you could enhance their experience? Explain membership options in simple terms and invite them back? Was the restroom messy? Was the staff talking to each other instead of the membership? Did the space feel cluttered and unmanageable with your people-flow patterns as classes / sessions let out? You catch my drift! Address the nitty-gritty details up-front so that they can just slip out of the focus of the patron’s full experience

Take the time to really analyze the details of the first client experience and make necessary adjustments as quickly as possible as if the life of your business depends on it – because it does! 

Post was originally published by the Association of Fitness Studios, where Bahneman serves on the Industry Advisory Panel.

3 Tips for Building the Best Team Possible in Your Fitness Studio

I am overdue on hitting this blog deadline, but I was waiting for inspiration to strike! Ever felt that way? In my procrastination and with a growing to-do list, inspiration didstrike at the most unexpected moment. Attending a wedding last weekend, I seemed to be seated among the who’s who of power players in the local fitness studio scene. It was refreshing to see that we ALL cut loose and escaped from our studios for the weekend, so I considered that we might be doing something right, clearly developing great teams to hold down the fort(s) as we create some work/life balance!

 

Enjoying a friendly chat, one studio owner said “I opened my studio because I saw what my former boss was doing and felt I could do it better. And let’s just be honest, most of us are learning as we go, even winging-it at times.” To some degree, I agree with that statement. There is a lot of trial and error in the fitness studio business (in any business!), and what works for me may very well not work in your studio concept, establishment, and market. However, once we do ultimately figure out the magical elixir for our own studio success, setting up sound operations and frameworks are a must for a scalable, sustainable business endeavor.

 

Building a great team is vital; every team member in your small business matters. The right team does not necessarily happen overnight, so patience as you refine the process of team building in your studio is a must. 

 

Here are three tips, practices that I have implemented that have ultimately led to a powerhouse team in our studio: 

 

1.    Create a vision for your team and write the details of that vision down. When you need to hire, ask yourself “Does this person fit into the clear vision that has been created for the studio?” Hiring merely out of necessity is a sure-fire way to run into challenges down the road. Create, and support, a like-minded tribe of talented professionals who bring unique talents to your studio vision for ultimate success.

2.    Design a framework, or hiring plan. We have a three-tiered system for how we determine hiring steps when staffing needs arise. This takes the guess-work out of the process. When the studio has void, we have a tried and true system to turn to by which we critically evaluate filling a position. That framework allows us to custom-design our team in a mindful, systematic way. Like the Constitution of the United States, frameworks created must be tight enough to guide the process, but flexible enough to flow with time and changing needs.

3.    Hire employees over independent contractors. I know this can feel taxing on the finances of a small business owner. However, employees are overwhelmingly more committed, will help build your brand, and generally have more buy-in. You can legally exert more control over the behaviors and performance of employees as you shape your brand and the overall studio experience. It is worth it.

 

Just when you have the perfect staff in place, someone will relocate, start a family, switch careers, or simply move on! That is the natural ebb and flow of the industry, and of life. Trust your people instincts and partner that with a sound system in place, and the process for maintaining a powerful team becomes (nearly) seamless). 

Post was originally published by the Association of Fitness Studios, where Bahneman serves on the Industry Advisory Panel.

5 Lessons Learned

What I Wish I’d Known When I Started My Yoga Studio

“We are what we repeatedly do” said Aristotle. If that is true, then the early days of a small business start-up story line can be scary to read! Even with business planning and preparation down to the finest detail – we don’t know what we don’t know until we are in the trenches, and often we aren’t exactly sure what to ask. 

 

Like a child’s growth, a business has various phases that demand different types of attention and love as it matures. Birth and “infancy” in a business is exciting, demanding, frustrating, tiring, and still (somehow) joyful! But like your new baby, no matter how much you are pushed to the end of your rope, you cannot and would not ever give it back! We learn to flow with each stage of its growth. I hope to shed light on a big topic; to share my unique vantage point to inspire colleagues on the way to studio success!

 

1.    Identify your key differentiators early on, and plan your marketing strategy accordingly. With a quality product and operation in place, it is vitally important to know what sets your business apart in a noisy space. From there, marketing is an important focus to have. A poor product is a poor product and no amount of marketing will change that nor will a business survive! Certain your operation is singing? You need to toot the horn to let them know you there! You can have the best thing in the world going, but unless no one knows about you, struggle is likely. What will make your business stand out and ultimately survive in a saturated market? Clarity in your purpose (your Why?) and a good marketing strategy. From finding your traffic, to capturing these folks, to nourishing your relationships and getting the sale (again and again), you must invest in creating differentiation in your niche and commit to a sound marketing plan. If we could do it all again, we would invest substantially more time and money in this all the way back to pre-opening days. Do it now.

2.    Your vibe attracts your tribe, and your team is everything. Your staff is a literal extension of yourself, and walking representation of the brand you are building. Hire carefully, watch and listen, trust your gut, let go if it isn’t working. Your reputation and survival depend on it. Small businesses do not have the luxury of wading through long, drawn out PIPs – every team member plays a pivotal role in the success of the business every day! Do not be afraid to make a necessary team changes, nor dwell on what others might think; make shifts thoughtfully and take timely actions that you know are best for your business for the long term. You alone hold a huge responsibility of keeping the business alive for everyone involved! 

3.    Focus on your strengths, hire out for the rest. You will not be great at everything. Small business owners have a lot on their plates, and limited resources to get it all done. Every moment of your time management matters as a studio owner. Focus on what you are really good at, and hire out for the rest when you can. Case in point, accounting is not my strong suit. Before opening a studio, I attended accounting classes and read bookkeeping books. At the end of the day, guess what? Accounting is still not my strongest suit! Do you know what is? Engaging clients, generating leads, connecting to my community, creating a team, business strategy, visioning, and more. I was spending too much time refining a skill I struggled with, rather than efficiently utilizing my natural talents in business. While I have a great understanding of the stats and data analytics in my business, I always have a trusted accountant and bookkeeper on my side! Your professional skill-set will certainly grow over time, but do not hamstring yourself early-on and create more stress! Budget for the services you know you will need help with in advance in your business plan and capital needs.

4.    Consider how to expand your boundaries sooner than later. My business partner and I ask ourselves as strategize. “Where are the yogis, to still-to-be yogis, and how will we reach them?” Truth be told, there are plenty of yogis now but with plenty of yoga class options! So our question is valid and on-point, but we are also constantly figuring out best ways to reach yogis outside of the “traditional” physical radius around our studio. Can you take your fitness studio services into the online world in any way? The world has grown smaller in many ways, and our ability to reach grows greater every day. Consider the possibilities, and decide best ways to stretch outside of the boundaries you may have once set for your fitness studio.

5.    Manage your time and create healthy self-care practices, or burn-out is imminent. It is a fine life to pursue your passion, do what you love each day, and make a living doing it! But that creates inherent grey in our lives, when we work days and into the night, and “occasional” weekends too! We love it, right? Business depends on us and we are happiest there, right? Sure. But the fastest way to steal all the joy from the experience is to never allow for separation, for adequate rest and recovery of your body, mind and spirit. Personally, I felt guilty when I wasn’t doing something, anything, to “move the needle” for the business. Then I began to resent what was once the greatest gift of my life. Now, no matter what, one half to a full day a week is dedicated to taking a break by going on a hike, making a coffee date, anything non-work related. And I (gasp!) silence my phone. Figure out what re-charges your battery, and commit to it like your life and business depend on it. Because they do. 

 

Cherish the saying “hold the vision, trust the process”. Studio ownership is a marathon, not a sprint. The transition from being a stellar fitness and wellness professional, into studio ownership and actually operating a successful fitness studio is huge and the leap cannot be underestimated! A sound business and marketing plan, your mission, vision, and core values will continue to guide the decision-making process and resultant action-plans as your grow. Seek mentors, follow your instincts and be patient. Enjoy every step in the journey and use every mis-step as a learning experience. When you know better, do better and good luck! 

Post was originally published in 2017 by the Association of Fitness Studios where Bahneman serve son the Industry Advisory Panel.

Coming Soon!

Coming Soon!

Sweat Equity: 
(def) (noun)
An interest or increased value in a property earned from labor toward upkeep or restoration.

The Sweat Equity Blog, a trusted compass for entrepreneurs.